Wednesday, November 16, 2022

A Great Big Compilation of Charles Spurgeon Quotes

I’ve been reading a fair amount of Spurgeon’s sermons lately, and recording them for a new YouTube channel, Historic Homilies. If you would like to listen to audio readings of Spurgeon sermons, check out the channel!

Anyway, as I’m reading the sermons, I’m always highlighting stuff that I like, or even things that simply strike me as mildly interesting. This will be a place for me to compile all of those snippets, in no particular order. It will be an ever-growing list.


“A God whom we could understand would be no God.”

“So there be many spiritual sleepwalkers in our midst, who think that they are awake. But they are somnambulists, not awake, but men who walk and talk in their sleep.”

“The proof of the Christian is in the living.”

“Man grows from childhood up to manhood naturally; in grace, men grow from manhood down to childhood, and the nearer we come to true childhood, the nearer we come to the image of Christ. For was not Christ called “a child,” even after He had ascended up to heaven? ‘Thy holy child Jesus.’”

“Suppose you should see in tomorrow’s newspaper (although, by the way, if you believed anything you saw there you would probably be mistaken) . . .”

“As I hurried forward, with an awful speed, I began to doubt my very existence; I doubted if there were a world, I doubted if there were such a thing as myself. . . . But here the devil foiled himself: for the very extravagance of the doubt, proved its absurdity.”

“You are not Bible readers. You say you have the Bible in your houses; do I think you are such heathens as not to have a Bible? But when did you read it last? How do you know that your spectacles, which you have lost, have not been there for the last three years?”

“When a promise is general, you may take it in its widest possible meaning. Particulars restrain and restrict, but where there are no particulars, then you have unlimited range. ‘I will give you rest’—rest about everything, rest at all times, rest in every part of your nature.”

“Some have fallen into such a condition that they believe nothing, unless, indeed, it should not happen to be in the Bible—and then they will believe it. But if it is in God’s Word, then, of course, they feel it necessary to doubt it.”

“I believe that living in communion with God is the only sure cure for doubt.”

“But remember that the Christ, who invites the erring sinner before conversion, invites the erring believer after conversion.”

“This is the kind of rest that the Lord Jesus Christ gives—rest of the deepest, truest kind—rest which the world cannot give and which the world cannot possibly take away.”

“Now look here, beloved—there is none too much joy in the world. Do not you go about killing any whenever you see it. Rather try to encourage it, and if you see a young Christian happy in believing, and you do not happen to be as cheerful as he is, do not try and take his joy from him. . . . Warn the young believer of all the sin against which he should be on his guard, but do not hold up before him a gloomy view of the Christian life.”

“A hundred years ago, a man went to the Lord Jesus with this promise, ‘I will give you rest,’ and the Lord Jesus gave him rest. Fifty years ago, another man went with this promise, and he said ‘Lord, there it is! You said, “I will give you rest,”’ and the Lord gave him rest. Now tonight take that promise to yourselves; it is just as good as if it had never been fulfilled. I give my neighbor a check; he goes with it to the bank, and gets the cash for it. Now suppose the banker returns that check to me, and I go with it to the bank, and try to cash it again. ‘No,’ they say, ‘we have cashed that check once, and that is done with.’ But you may take God’s check, and go to the Bank of Heaven every day, and every hour in the day, and the check is just as good as if it had never been cashed before. ‘I will give you rest.’ You tried that when you were twenty-one; try it now that you are seventy. When you were forty, in the day of your trouble, you said, ‘Lord, give me rest;’ now that you are eighty, the promise still stands just as good as ever. God’s promises are not like a bundle of old checks that are done with, and sent back to the drawer—they are ever fresh and ever new.”

“Oh, the perfect repose, the unutterable bliss, that will be yours and mine before long. I say, ‘before long,’ for in this great congregation I do not doubt that there are several brothers and sisters who will see the King in His beauty before many weeks are gone. I could wish that it were my lot to go first among you, but if it may not be, will, you shall go on a little ahead, my brothers and my sisters, and we will follow in our turn.”

“I must, however, just remind you that, when Jesus says, ‘I will give you rest,’ He does not mean that He will make you lazy. Lazy people cannot rest—they never know what rest means. There must be labor to give us rest.”

“And he who begins to learn the faith in one way, and then tries to learn it in another way, and then attempts to learn it in yet another way, is more likely to be a skeptic than to be a saint.”

“Whenever the salt is put on the table, let us see in it a lesson to us to season our conversation with thanks, of which salt we cannot use too much.”

“Beloved, our crusty tempers and sour faces will never be evangelists. They may become messengers of Satan, but they will never become helpers of the gospel.”

“We should say of the Lord, ‘Let Him do what seems good to Him, if He will give us health, we will thank Him, if He will send us sickness, we will thank Him. If He indulges us with prosperity or if He tries us with affliction, if the Holy Spirit will but enable us, we will never cease to praise the Lord as long as we live.’”

“To the fullest performance of this duty there must be a subordination of ourselves to the will of God. We must not desire to have our own way; we must be content to say, ‘Not my will, but Yours be done.’ I cannot give thanks to God always for all things till my old self is put down. While self rules, the hungry horseleech is in the heart, and that is fatal to gratitude. Self and discontent are mother and child.”

“If a man is rich, and God has given him a thankful spirit, he cannot be too rich. If he will give thanks to God, he may be worth millions, and they will never hurt him. On the other hand, if a man has learned to give thanks to God, and he becomes poor, he cannot be too poor; he will be able to bear up under the severest poverty. The rich man should learn to find God in all things; the poor man should learn to find all things in God.”

“We ought also to thank God for the mercies which we do not see, as well as for those which are evident. We receive, perhaps, ten times as many mercies which escape our notice as those which we observe—mercies which fly by night on soft wings and bless us while we sleep.”

“It is not in the power of the enemy to injure the men of God when once self is dethroned, and the heart has learned to be resigned to the will of God. O, you are great, you are strong, you are rich, and you are mighty when you have bowed yourselves to the will of the Most High! Stoop that you may conquer! Bow that you may triumph! Yield that you may get the mastery. It is when we are nothing that we are everything—when we are weak that we are strong, it is when we have utterly become annihilated as to self, and God is all in all, it is then that we are filled with all the fullness of God. May the Holy Spirit conduct us into this spirit of perpetual thankfulness.”

“To have the feet taken out of the miry clay, and to feel them set on the rock of ages is a subject for eternal gratitude. But you have not received one spiritual mercy only, beloved brethren—nor two, nor twenty—you have had them strewn along your path in richest profusion. The stars above are not more numerous nor are the sands beneath more innumerable. Every hour, yes, every moment has brought a favor upon its wings. Look downward and give thanks, for you are saved from hell. Look on the right hand and give thanks, for you are enriched with gracious gifts. Look on the left hand and give thanks, for you are shielded from deadly ills. Look above you and give thanks, for heaven awaits you.”

“Nor is it alone for great and eternal benefits, but even for minor and temporary benefits we ought to give thanks. There ought not to be brought into the house a loaf of bread without thanksgiving. Nor should we cast a coal upon the fire without gratitude. We eat like dogs if we sit down to our meals without devoutly blessing God. We live like serpents if we never rise to devout recognition of the Lord’s kindness. We ought not to put on our garments without adoring God, or take them off to rest in our beds without praising Him. Each breath of air should inspire us with thanks, and the blood in our veins should circulate gratitude throughout our system.”

“You have heard, perhaps, of a Puritan who met his son, each one of them traveling some 10 or 12 miles to meet the other. And the son said to his father, ‘Father, I am thankful to God for a very remarkable providence which I have had on my journey here. My horse has stumbled three times with me, and yet I am unhurt.’ The Puritan replied, ‘My dear Son, I have to thank God for an equally remarkable providence on my way to you. For my horse did not once stumble all the way.’ If we happen to be in an accident by railway, we feel so grateful that our limbs are not broken, but should we not be thankful when there is no accident? Is not that the better thing of the two? If you were to fall into poverty, and someone was to restore you to your former position in trade, you would be very grateful. Should you not be grateful that you have not fallen into poverty? Bless God for His unknown benefits. Extol Him for favors which you do not see, always giving thanks to God for all things.”

Sermon: God’s Thoughts of Peace, and Our Expected End

“No, beloved, His thoughts are not of evil. Though the Lord hates your sin, He does not hate you. Though He is the enemy of your follies, He is your own firm friend; yes, He is all the truer friend, because He fights against your faults.”

“I have never yet visited a member of this church who has expressed the least fear in their dying moments ... They pass away as if they were going to a wedding rather than to a tomb — as if it were the most joyful thing that ever happened to them to have reached their expected end. Doubts are all driven away when you see how believers die.”

“The Lord never forgets His own, for He has engraved them upon the palms of His hands. Never at any moment does Jehovah turn His thoughts from His beloved, even though He has the whole universe to rule. He says of His church, ‘I the Lord do keep it; I will water it every moment: lest any hurt it, I will keep it night and day.’”

“Welcome clouds, if showers of mercy are to come of them. God forbid we should always have sunshine, for that would mean drought. Let the clouds come if they bring a blessed rain.”

“Our troubles drive us to our knees. If it had not been for Esau, Jacob had never wrestled at Jabbok. I hope we usually go to our closets of our own accord, but often we are whipped there. Many of the most earnest prayers that ever rise to heaven come from us when we are in bondage under grief.”

“There are several subjects now upon the public mind, concerning which it is wise to say little or
nothing, because it is not easy to decide about them. Upon a certain matter one asks you this question,
and another asks you another question, and it is possible that you have so carefully weighed and measured the arguments both pro and con that you cannot come to a conclusion either way. Your thoughts differ from day to day, and therefore you do not yet know them. You need not be ashamed of this; it shows that you have a just sense of your own imperfect knowledge. A fool soon makes up his mind, because there is so very little of it, but a wise man waits and considers. The case is far otherwise with the only wise God. The Lord is not a man that He should need to hesitate, His infinite mind is made up, and He knows His thoughts. With the Lord there is neither question nor debate, 'He is in one mind, and none can turn Him.' His purpose is settled, and He adheres to it. He is resolved to reward them that diligently seek Him, and to honor those that trust in Him. He is resolved to remember His covenant forever, and to keep His promises to those who believe Him. His thought is that the people whom He has formed for Himself shall show forth His praise. The Lord knows them that are His; He knows whom He gave to His Son, and He knows that these shall be His jewels forever and ever. Beloved, when you do not know your own mind, God knows His mind.”




No comments: